Curriculum has been designed with a focus on a set of program learning outcomes. 

The Ziegler Rabbi:
1. Masters the Masorah – synthetically and technically,
2. Connects with lay people and is skilled in outreach,
3. Distills the Tradition in ways useful to people’s lives,
4. Is motivated by God and shares that faith,
5. Loves Jews as well as Judaism,
6. Pursues a socially-conscious rabbinate,
7. Elicits the theological underpinnings of sacred texts,

  • BIB 506 INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS The Hebrew Bible is a complex collection of writings composed centuries ago by people whose problems, interests, and ways of life were often very different from our own; yet, its influence permeates many aspects of contemporary religious faith communities as well as general Western culture. Much in contemporary law, literature, art, morals, and religion reflect its books as these have come to be interpreted.

  • BIB 509 READINGS IN HUMASH

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Students who have no real experience reading the Torah in Hebrew learn the skills to decipher a verse in the Torah. They learn the fundamentals of biblical Hebrew, how to look up words in a biblical lexicon, and basic grammar. Students are responsible for preparing the Hebrew Biblical text using a lexicon and grammar book, writing their own translations and reading these aloud in class. They are also responsible for analyzing the verbs for their roots, conjugations, tense, etc.

  • BIB 510 HUMASH WITH RASHI

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class builds on the previous semester’s class introducing the Humash to broaden the student’s exposure to include traditional Jewish commentaries to the Humash, mainly Rashi. This will allow the students to begin to appreciate the keen reading sensitivity of the commentators, begin to understand Rashi’s problems with key texts and his solutions to those problems, and to recognize how the commentators (mainly Rashi) utilize Biblical anomalies, ambiguities and literary richness to grapple with the religious and existential challenges of their own times and communities.

  • BIB 518 TORAH ANTHOLOGIES

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS Students take this course their final semester before ordination. It is an opportunity for synthesizing and utilizing skills and knowledge, which they have acquired through their school career. This course exposes students to a variety of early modern and contemporary tools that rabbis can use in their study of the Chumash. The students also review of the resources available for the preparation and development of meaningful lessons and derashot.

  • BIB 525 MIKRAOT GEDOLOT

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will familiarize the student with the narratives, principle characters, themes, and highlights of the weekly parashiyot of the Torah. In addition, it will expose them to several different academic approaches to the study of Bible (including but not limited to: anthropological, literary, source critical, myth/ritual, feminist, historical, sociological, archaeological). Using these varied approaches in order to get a sense of the range of tools needed for an integrated understanding of Torah, the student should be capable of researching a biblical passage or topic using several of these approaches, and should end the semester able to identify key persons, places, themes, and phrases by Parashah.

  • BIB 528 NEVI’IM & KHETUVIM

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will complete the introductory survey courses in Bible with a focused exploration of the second and third sections of the Tanakh, with particular attention paid to those prophetic and poetic materials in these sections that have been utilized for Jewish liturgical purposes (Haftarot, liturgical psalms, etc).

  • BIB 542 TANACH WITH MEFARSHIM (TAKEN IN ISRAEL)

    LECTURE 4 CREDITS This course will strengthen students’ ability to read biblical texts with traditional commentaries. Although it may vary from year to year, it will likely be one semester of Torah and one semester of Nach as determined in consultation between the Yeshiva and the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies.

  • EDU 567 CREATING SACRED COMMUNITIES

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS The seminar itself will follow a model of “doing synagogue differently” that was pioneered by Synagogue 2000 (now Synagogue 3000) over the course of ten years of work with nearly 100 congregations of all denominations. Students will read widely in the developing literature in “synagogue transformation.” They will meet guest speakers who are working on the frontlines of the most exciting initiatives to re-invigorate synagogue life. And, when possible, they will travel to Orange County to do a site visit at one of the more famous “megachurches,” Saddleback Church.

  • HEB 503A HEBREW IIA CONVERSATION

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This second-year conversation course in Hebrew stresses intermediate vocabulary, reading comprehension, oral expression and essay writing Offered in the fall semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 503B HEBREW IIA GRAMMAR

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This course offers the entire Torat Hanikud with mastering all seven Binyamin HaSh’lemim and their proper vowels. Offered in the fall semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 504A HEBREW IIB CONVERSATION

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This conversation class is a direct continuation of the course offered in the spring semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 504B HEBREW IIB GRAMMAR

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This grammar class offers skills in all the irregular verbs (G’zarot) in all tenses. Offered in the spring semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 505A HEBREW IIIA CONVERSATION

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This one-semester course, following Hebrew II, is designed to sharpen students’ Hebrew conversational skills. Special attention is given to enrich the vocabulary, both in the written and spoken word. Short pieces of Hebrew Literature will be introduced. Offered in the fall semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 505B HEBREW IIIA GRAMMAR

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS Taught entirely in Hebrew, this advanced grammar course focuses on the elements of Hebrew grammar: Nikud and Binyamin. Offered in the fall semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 506A HEBREW IIIB CONVERSATION

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This sixth course in Hebrew immerses students in all phases of Hebrew expression and comprehension through essay writing and literature reading. Continuation of HEB 505A. Offered in the spring semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 506B HEBREW IIIB GRAMMAR

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS Continuation of HEB 505B plus G’zarot. Offered in the spring semester. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 511 HEBREW FOR READING COMPREHENSION I

    LECTURE 4 CREDITS This course focuses on biblical Hebrew and emphasizes the phonology and the morphology of the language. Students read selections of narrative biblical texts, both abridged and in the original language. Prerequisite: The equivalent of a one-year university level course in modern Hebrew.

  • HEB 512 HEBREW FOR READING COMPREHENSION II

    LECTURE 4 CREDITS A further exploration of the morphology of classical Hebrew with reference to both the biblical and rabbinic dialects. Students read narrative biblical texts in the original language as well as various vocalized and unvocalized texts composed in rabbinic Hebrew. Prerequisite: Hebrew 511.

  • HEB 513 HEBREW FOR READING COMPREHENSION III

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course includes an introduction to the syntax of biblical and rabbinic texts and the differences between the two dialects. Students will also review the grammar of Babylonian Aramaic. Students read prophetic/poetic biblical texts, unvocalized texts in rabbinic Hebrew, and Aramaic selections from the Babylonian Talmud. Prerequisite: Hebrew 512.

  • HEB 514 HEBREW FOR READING COMPREHENSION IV

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS A further exploration of the syntax of biblical and rabbinic texts and the differences between the two dialects. Students will read prophetic/poetic biblical texts, unvocalized texts in rabbinic Hebrew, and selected academic articles written in modern Hebrew. Prerequisite: Hebrew 513.

  • HEB 537 ADVANCED HEBREW EXPRESSION I

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course is designed to use extended language to discuss and write about practical, social, political, professional, religious and abstract topics. The emphasis is on expressive and productive Hebrew with the intent of further developing advanced language skills. A collection of Hebrew literature in its non-modified, original text will be taught. Creative writing will be practiced. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • HEB 538 ADVANCED HEBREW EXPRESSION II

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Along with the emphasis on expressive and productive Hebrew, students will read original literature and Biblical text in class. Continuation of HEB 537. PERMISSION OF HEBREW COORDINATOR ONLY.

  • PHL 512 INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH PHILOSOPHY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS The course is an introduction to an understanding of Jewish philosophy, to some of the major thinkers in Jewish Philosophy, and an exposure to the methods of Jewish philosophy in ancient and medieval periods. It traces Jewish thought from the Bible to the Rabbis to the medieval period. It also covers major themes in Jewish philosophy, as illustrated by representative readings of modern and contemporary Jewish philosophers. The topics include God, the problem of evil, revelation, the authority of Jewish law, the ideology of modern Jewish religious movements, Jewish moral goals, concepts of salvation and afterlife, Zionism, and prayer. Students read various philosophers, compare their approaches to a given topic, and evaluate their views as to their philosophical soundness and their Jewish relevance. Through this pedagogy, students learn how to evaluate arguments.

  • PHL 513 INTRODUCTION TO KABBALAH & HASSIDUT

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Jewish Mysticism, commonly referred to as Kabbalah, is the product of thousands of years of esoteric speculation, revelatory experience, scholasticism, pietism and risk. This course will analyze the role of mysticism in Jewish history through analysis of the major theological ideas of classical Kabbalah. The second half of the course will carry the narrative into the world of Hasidism, which has been an important influence in Conservative Judaism practically since its inception. These traditions will be examined in terms of its historical development, its relationship to mystical experiences and its sacred literature. Attention will also be paid to the relationship of Kabbalah to other kinds of mysticism, in line with general issues in the study of religious mysticism. In the second part it will engage in learning primary chassidic teachings of Chassidic Rebbes that stem from the conception of the movement till our generation. It will engage in close textual analysis of primary sources as a means of understanding the evolution of the Chassidic vocabulary and library. We will encounter the teachings of core voices in the Chassidic movement and explore the essence of their theology and spiritual legacy.

  • PHL 551 DEVELOPMENT & THEOLOGY OF LITURGY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will examine Jewish liturgy through two prisms – a chronological survey of its development historically and diachronically by looking at the theology expressed in particular prayers, siddurim, and to be found in the structure of the liturgy itself.

  • PHL 553 CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM: THEOLOGY, LAW, ETHICS I AND II

    LECTURE 4 CREDITS This course is an integration of the three primary areas in which Conservative Judaism’s worldview and perspective offer a unique and important take on Jewish tradition and faith. Looking at the theological perspectives and insights of the leaders of the Movement, at the theories of law and their application, and at the pervasive impact of ethics, students will have a solid perspective with which to identify and through which they can face the issues confronting the Jewish world today.

  • PHL 562 ISSUES OF JUSTICE

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This course is designed to create a space within the curriculum at Ziegler in which the learning and conversation is centered on issues of justice. It will also focus students to develop a set of concepts or principles and a vocabulary, which can be transported, translated and deployed beyond the walls of this classroom and institution. The goal is to start a conversation here, which can also be engaged in outside this community and this institution. The direct practice of this course will be to engage issues of justice through and around sugyot in the Bavli.

  • PHL 563 HALAKHAH OF LITURGY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will familiarize the student Jewish liturgy as an expression of halakhic priorities, categories, values, and parameters. Given that the Siddur begins as a teshuvah and is an exemplar of rabbinic rules of prayer, this course will illumine the halakhic dynamic that launched the Siddur and continues to shape its contours and its development.

  • PRS 501 SENIOR SEMINAR/SENIOR INTERNSHIP I

    SEMINAR 3 CREDITS This workshop gives graduating senior an opportunity to reflect on their internship experiences. It also prepares them for the job search and interviewing process and other final aspects of leaving school and entering the professional world of the rabbi. The students are given an opportunity to assimilate the experiences they have accumulated over their five-year program in rabbinical school. They are also given the specific tools needed to be effective in a job interview, to write a resume, to be aware of the elements of the job search process, from application to contract negotiation.

  • PRS 505 FIELD PLACEMENT

    0 CREDITS This Field Placement is an introduction to the rabbinic roles in Jewish federations and a variety of other Jewish agencies. Under the supervision of a mentor, students observe and learn about the work rabbis perform in Jewish organizations as well as the nature of rabbinic relationships with staff and lay people.

  • PRS 506 FIELD PLACEMENT II

    0 CREDITS This Field Placement is an introduction to the rabbinic roles in congregations, educational institutions, and Jewish agencies. Under the supervision of a mentor, students observe and learn about the work rabbis perform in these diverse Jewish organizations as well as the nature of rabbinic relationships with staff and lay people.

  • PRS 507 SYNAGOGUE SKILLS SEMINAR

    SEMINAR 1 CREDIT Students are required to obtain a certain skills set each year prior to ordination in insure that they have the necessary skills to be shlichei tzibbur and baalei koreh of Torah, Haftarot and Megillot. The skills that students are expected to acquire each year are sequentially determined based on level of difficulty and frequency of appearance in the synagogue service. They are skills the students will use as they participate in the Ziegler Minyanim.

  • PRS 510 HOSPITAL CHAPLAINCY

    1 CREDIT This training course is an intensive educational experience that will provide an introduction to religious counseling in a hospital setting. Supervised experiences in pastoral counseling will be supplemented by class sessions dealing with methods of pastoral counseling as well as the issues of illness and healing.

  • PRS 520 PASTORAL COUNSELING I

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This course covers some basic aspects of psychology essential to understanding the challenges of rabbinic counseling (the unconscious, transference, and counter-transference); effective strategies in dealing with mental illness and the mental health system; pastoral counseling to the sick, dying and bereaved; and drug addiction and alcoholism.

  • PRS 521 PASTORAL COUNSELING II

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This course will address issues of group process (e.g., on boards and committees); rabbinic counseling on family life (marriage and parenting); understanding and helping non-normative congregants (divorced, childless, homosexual); conversion and intermarriage; and mental health for the rabbi and the rabbinic family.

  • PRS 530 ADVANCED HOMILETICS I

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS An important element of a rabbi’s work is effective public speaking. This course allows the students to draw on the vast corpus of knowledge and experience they have gained while in rabbinical school to write derashot and sermons. It also refines the public speaking skills they have acquired up until this point. The course also gives the students the opportunity to critique a variety of forums (synagogue services, published sermons, sermons they have heard, etc.). This helps the students to critique and improve their own public homiletical skills. Throughout the course of two semesters, students will draw upon a variety of traditional and modern sources to create and deliver sermons and derashot. The course helps students to understand the art of rabbinic speaking including subject matter, style, resources, and how to deal with difficult topics. The Professor and classmates critique these presentations. Students also review synagogue services, write a prayer commentary or an original prayer, and rabbinic letters.

  • PRS 552 JEWISH LIFECYCLES

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This seminar explores the integration of the academic, professional and personal dimensions of begin a rabbi. It focuses on the life-cycle rituals, with special emphasis on the concept of Covenant implicit in each of them. Students explore the role of the rabbi at the key moments of personal, family and communal life, and how rabbis bring together the wisdom of the tradition with the insights of contemporary theories of individual and family psychology.

  • RAB 548-01 Poskim I (Taken in Israel)

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Through the study of specific halakhic issues, this course will provide an introduction to the process of halakhic development grounded in the Talmud, but with emphasis on the codes of law from the medieval period including: Maimonides, Tur, and Shulhan Aruch, each with its subsequent commentators. Each code will be studied from the perspective of its construction, style, and purpose, and the different codes will be compared and contrasted.

  • RAB 507 INTRODUCTION TO HALAKHAH

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the nature of Jewish law, as reflected in classical Jewish sources and in modern practice, with special attention to the practices of the Conservative movement. Specific topics covered include: The Sabbath, Festivals and Fast Days, Laws of Dietary Laws and a combination of relevant modern legal issues students must be familiar with. Students are presented with an overview of the structure of the literature of the halakhah. They are required to read specifics passages from various halakhic texts, which are then synthesized through class discussion. Students are also responsible for doing independent reading of Klein (see below), which they are tested on throughout the semester. At various points throughout the semester students are also introduced to the major legal texts of the tradition and taught to navigate their pages.

  • RAB 509 INTRODUCTION TO MISHNAH & TOSEFTA/BEIT MIDRASH

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS The first Rabbinics text course is an introduction to Mishnah and Tosefta. The student learns how to parse a Mishnaic text-literally in regards to syntax and grammar of Rabbinic Hebrew; and also how to understand the style and sense of Mishnah. The same is true for Tosefta. The student then learns to understand the relationship between Mishnah and Tosefta in individual chapters. Chapters of Mishnah from various tractates and orders are studied, and the student is taught to recognize technical terms, and to be able to distinguish between layers or voices in a Mishnaic text. The student is also trained to use the popular dictionaries often utilized in rabbinic literature. At the same time the student acquires an overview of the historical background of these texts, and discussions of the development of Mishnah and Tosefta from secondary literature. This discussion is brought to bear in the classroom when appropriate. Students prepare for their classes in hevruta while supervised in the Beit Midrash.

  • RAB 510 TALMUD WITH RASHI /BEIT MIDRASH

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS The first in the sequence of Talmud course begins the process of introducing the student to the argumentation, syntax, language, and thought process of a Talmudic sugya. This is the course in which major emphasis is placed on Aramaic grammar; dividing of sugyot into questions and answers; understanding the way language functions: Aramaic vs. Hebrew; identifying the layers of sugyot (tannaitic, amoraic, stammaitic); beginning to understand Talmudic rhetoric, i.e. “technical terms”; and beginning to understand Rashi and his method.

  • RAB 511 TALMUD WITH RASHI I/BEIT MIDRASH

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS Building on and, to some extent, assuming the students’ knowledge of sugyot from RAB 510, this course continues the above description (RAB 510) and seeks to add the following goals: Enhance the student’s ability to handle Talmudic texts; give the student a better understanding of Talmud by teaching within one chapter of one tractate rather than selected sugyot; introduce the student to the commentaries of the Tosfetan school.

    The student will acquire an understanding of the Toseftan project: what it is and how it differs with Rashi’s project. The student will gain a specific understanding of how a Tosafot commentary works: What are the technical terms; what are the types of questions the Tosafot asks and why; and an appreciation of the Tosafot school and the cultural context of that school of commentary is supplied through secondary readings.

  • RAB 512 TALMUD WITH COMMENTARIES II/BEIT MIDRASH

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS Building on the students’ engagement with Rashi and Tosafot, this fourth rabbinicstext course introduces the student to the more sophisticated and complicated legal and theoretical argumentation of the medieval commentators. Especial emphasis is placed on the pre- and postToseftan Spanish commentary tradition. At the same time, the student is made aware of the ways in which contemporary academic commentators grapple with some of the same sugyot and issues in different ways and with different methodologies.

  • RAB 524 INTRODUCTION TO MIDRASH

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This is a shiur in important sections of the midrashim included in the anthology Midrash Rabbah, with an eye to the later collection Pirkei de-Rabbi Eliezer. It covers selected readings in Genesis Rabbah and Pirkei de-Rabbi Eliezer. Individual sections of Bereshit Rabbah are read, with an eye to analyzing the use of language in the classical Midrash, the proem, use of quotations from Tanakh, etc. Selections from the work Pirkei de-Rabbi Eliezer are also read. There is an emphasis on the structure of the given midrashic homily, with much emphasis on acquisition of reading skills. The class is taught in seminar format, with classroom participation. Each student prepares and presents materials for a given week's lecture. There is also a final exam.

  • RAB 536 TEACHING RABBINIC TEXTS AS SPIRITUAL MENTORING I

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS This course is guided to enable rabbis-to-be the use of primary sources as spiritual mentors. During the studying process, students are expected to define for themselves their roles as rabbis and teachers while articulating the strengths and weakness of different models of leadership. The primary tool for achieving these goals is in-depth learning of rabbinic and chassidic sources. We will allow the text to function as a spiritual mentor and in such a way experience the power of such engagement with text in a direct manner. We will observe how different texts avail themselves to alternate modes of leadership and intervention. The sources with both support and challenge us as we progress. A second venue of exploration will be based on personal presentations and the presence of TEXT in our lives. The emphasis will be on the texts that have molded us into being the person we are today.

  • RAB 538 TALMUD SYNTHESIS/BEIT MIDRASH

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course is an integration of high-level Talmud study with selected sugyot (Talmudic passages) that are: 1) directly relevant to current trends in modern Judaism and, 2) the foundational sources for essential areas of Jewish thought and law. Topics may include but are not limited to: Authority in halakhah, Theodicy, verbal deception, communal hierarchy and more. Special attention will be paid to both the literary structure of the passages studied as well as traditional Talmudic paradigms. Each student will be expected to present an original comprehensive analysis of one sugya during the course of the semester related to a pertinent topic in Jewish life. This course will be a combination of hevruta study in the Beit Midrash and class time going over the passages previously prepared.

  • RAB 543-02 TOPICS IN HALAKHAH LEMAASEH (TAKEN IN ISRAEL)

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course will provide a Bekkiyut style of study of Halakhah using one particular Code as its primary text (i.e. Arukh ha-Shulchan, Mishnah Berurah, Shulchan Aruch, or other). The course will address topics in daily halakhah such as Shabbat, Yom Tov (Regalim and High Holidays), Kashrut, Niddah, Marriage/Divorce, or Aveilut.

  • RAB 551 READINGS IN RABBINICS

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS The purpose of this course is to give the students an introduction to rabbinic literature in Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on gaining familiarity with the language and style of the material covered. Particular attention will be paid to the differences between Mishnaic Hebrew on the one hand, and classical Biblical Hebrew and Modern Hebrew on the other hand, in terms of grammar, syntax, style, and vocabulary. Students will also be exposed to Rashi script and increase ability to read fluently.

  • RAB 551 READINGS IN RABBINIC TEXTS I (6-YEAR STUDENTS ONLY)

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS The purpose of this course is to give the students an introduction to rabbinic literature in Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on gaining familiarity with the language and style of the material covered. Particular attention will be paid to the differences between Mishnaic Hebrew on the one hand, and classical Biblical Hebrew and Modern Hebrew on the other hand, in terms of grammar, syntax, style, and vocabulary. Students will also be exposed to Rashi script and increased ability to read fluently.

  • RAB 571-04 TALMUD RISHONIM I (Taken in Israel)

    LECTURE 6 CREDITS As the foundation of yeshiva study, Talmud courses will meet four times a week with the sessions divided between Beit Midrash preparation and classroom instruction. The course will integrate the study of the Talmudic sugya and its components, associated tannaitic sources and relevant manuscripts, along with classical medieval commentaries.

  • RAB 574 ADVANCED MIDRASH (TAKEN IN ISRAEL)

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS During the second year of the Ziegler School program, students take a one semester course which includes exposure to major works of Midrash and to secondary approaches to the study of Midrash. During the Israel year, students will take two semesters of Midrash which will continue to delve deeper into Midrashic texts and their structures while also exploring the interrelations between the text and the interpretive process. (Students may opt to take one semester of this course.)

  • RAB 575 TEACHING RABBINIC TEXTS

    LECTURE 2 CREDITS Jewish education is a serious issue today - getting Jews learning may be the make or break issue facing Conservative Judaism's future. This course will take the students’ mastery of rabbinic literature and offer paths to apply this mastery and love in teaching it to laypeople. Special attention will be paid to choosing appropriate texts, presentation of materials, creating successful learning environments, and how to introduce our laity to the beauty of rabbinic literature. Classes will be a mixture of the professor modeling the teaching the selected rabbinic texts from our major literary sources (Talmud, Midrash, Kabbalah, Codes etc.) and students presenting a model class designed for laypeople. Learning will emanate from hands-on teaching and thoughtful critique by classmates and professionals.

  • RAB 584 SPECIAL TOPICS IN TALMUD

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course will examine the interesting, and at times, challenging texts while continuing to develop skills and a sense of ownership of the material, deepening the understanding of Talmud and Rabbinic Judaism. Students will examine how the rabbis dealt with the issues of their world and discuss how these issues and coping techniques apply to the contemporary world and to the rabbinate.

  • RAB 591 MISHNAH LAB

    LAB 0 CREDITS The primary goals of this class are to assist RAB 509-01 students to successfully complete their semester of Mishnah and Tosefta learning, and to advance to beginning Talmud study in the Spring semester. The course will work closely with the Mishnah-Tosefta teachers to determine student needs and how to best assist in accomplishing these goals.

  • RAB 592 TALMUD LAB

    LAB 0 CREDITS The purpose of this course is to give the students who are studying first year Talmud texts and opportunity to study the language arts of Babylonian Jewish Aramaic. In a sense, it is a continuation of the Aramaic Intensive class from the beginning of the semester. Upon completion of the course, the student should be familiar with the grammatical forms of Babylonian Jewish Aramaic, and the basic elements of syntax and style.

THEMATIC SEMINARS
During years four and five of the program, students choose from amongst various thematic seminars to complete 4 semesters of seminars. Seminars vary year to year and are in the area of Jewish Thought and Practical Application. Students also have the option to do a senior capstone project in lieu of one seminar. Examples of the seminars include:

  • TSM 583 BIBLE COMMENTARIES FROM THE HASIDIC/YESHIVA WORLDS (PRACTICAL)

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Bible Commentaries from the Hasidic and Yeshiva Worlds: An Introduction to the Divrei Torah from the Hasidic rabbinical tradition as well as those that emerged from the Lithuanian Yeshivot. This course is also intended to provide students with knowledge of the content of each of the weekly parshiot and with a practical opportunity to master the skill of the D’var Torah as applied in various settings. Students will be expected to prepare texts in Hebrew for each session.

  • TSM 585 APPLIED JEWISH THEOLOGY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course will expose students to the most significant issues of Jewish theology as articulated by classical and modern thinkers including revelation, the nature of God, prayer, suffering and justice. It will help enable students to form a personal theology which shapes teaching and preaching in the everyday work-life of a rabbi.

  • TSM 587 THE HISTORY OF ANTI-SEMITISM

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS There is a widespread consensus in the Jewish community and in the media, among political analysts and social activists that antisemitism is on the rise today. Future Rabbis must know how to analyze the problem, understand its scope, its roots, what is unique about contemporary antisemitism and how it is both similar and different than previous manifestations of antisemitism. The must also be able to speak knowledgably to the Jewish community, to fellow clergy, to political and intellectual leadership and to the general community about the problem and can be done about it.

  • TSM 593 JUDAISM AND BIOETHICS (JEWISH THOUGHT)

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course explores the ethical issues involved in the following topics through secular and Jewish approaches to them: (1) The physician-patient relationship: the duties of physicians and patients; models of the physician-patient relationship; truth-telling and confidentiality; informed consent; medicine in a multicultural society. (2) Contested therapies and biomedical enhancement. (3) Human and animal research. (4) The end of life: preparing for death; defining death; removal of life support in dying patients; aid in dying; suicide; organ transplantation. (5) The beginning of life: preventing pregnancy through birth control or abortion; artificial reproductive techniques; embryonic stem cell research; genetic testing and interventions. (6) The distribution of health care.

  • TSM 595 CONCENTRATION PROJECT

    3 CREDITS As in the current curriculum, in fall of Year Five, students have the option to complete a final project, subject to the approval of the Ziegler Steering Committee. That project will be text based, demonstrating both mastery of the field and also ability to apply the rich textual heritage of that field to Graduate Division 140 Back to Table of Contents the spiritual, ethical, practical and historical concerns of today’s Jews. It can be a research paper, a creative project, an annotated curriculum, or a comprehensive exam on an agreed body of reading. Parameters for the culminating project will be set by the Steering Committee in dialogue with the student, and will be designed to demonstrate understanding, recall, mastery, the use of primary texts, and synthetic creativity.