An overview of Politics and Global Studies department course listings are provided. Please refer to the academic catalog for specific requirements and prerequisites. 

 

Prerequisite:

  • POL 100 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE AND POLITICAL THEORY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS An overview of the field of political science. Introduces students to major political theorists and major concepts in political science; how political scientists study politics, including the role of values and beliefs; sub-fields of political science; and writing in political science.

US Politics & Law:

  • POL 101 INTRODUCTION TO U.S. POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Introductory course in U.S. politics which provides an overview of the governmental institutions and political process of the U.S. political system, including political attitudes, the policymaking process, and analysis of critical issues. Partially fulfills the American History and Institutions requirement.

  • POL 320 AMERICAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS American Political Development (APD) is a sub-discipline within American Politics focused on explaining changes in the U.S. political system that have transformed fundamental characteristics of American politics. APD emphasizes the roles of political culture, ideas, institutions (the executive, Congress, the courts, and state and local governments) and political agents (political parties and interest groups) in shaping the long-term development of political conflict and public policy. This course will examine key concepts, analytical tools, and texts at the center of developmental inquiry.

  • POL 321 U.S. IMMIGRATION POLICY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Examination of U.S. immigration policy by using political science/foreign policy theories, as well as tracing the historical development of the policy area from the colonial period to the present-day. Emphasis on contemporary events and issues including undocumented immigration, deportation, terrorism, the Dream Act, high-skilled immigration, and the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • POL 323 PUBLIC POLICY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course introduces the intricacies of American public policy making including an examination of the process of public policy and the political context in which policies are developed.

  • POL 328 THE JUDICIAL PROCESS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course introduces students to the structure and function of both the federal and state court systems in the United States as well as gives students a greater understanding of how the American legal system and politics interact. The course reviews the basic legal theories of our judicial system, as well as the differences between the federal and state levels of courts. The texts and lectures will focus on methods of judicial selection in this country, the criminal justice system, the civil court process, the judicial socialization process, the role of lawyers in American society, and the role of the judicial system as a check and balance for government. The course also analyzes these concepts, actors and institutions from a variety of perspectives including theoretical, normative, and empirical approaches.

  • POL 329 TOPICS IN U.S. POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course focuses on different aspects of U.S. politics such as Congress, the Presidency. Topic varies each year. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT.

  • POL 330 LAW AND SOCIETY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS The course explores the intersection of law and politics and examines the reach of law into all aspects of American society and life from the family to community organizations to government agencies. Students address social, legal, and political issues at the national, state, and local levels on practical and theoretical terms through case studies drawn from current and historically significant events. In addition, the course provides students with the legal literacy necessary for success as community and business leaders and citizens. The course involves extensive student participation. Students with an interest in the study of politics, law, or contemporary society and those who want to understand what lawyers know and do should find the course valuable.

  • POL 331 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS A study of U.S. constitutional law through analysis of Supreme Court cases. Topics include: separation and division of power, implied limitations on government, right of privacy, and equal
    protection. RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITE: POL 101. Partially fulfills the American History and Institutions requirement.

Global Studies & International Relations:

  • POL 341 GLOBALIZATION AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS The term globalization is often used by people with differing ideas not only about what the term means, but about how globalization affects people’s lives. This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of international political economy by examining the multiple ways of conceptualizing the process of globalization in today’s world, and to the major debates about its effects, both positive and negative. Course material includes examination of globalization as an economic phenomenon, focusing on different historical patterns of trade and their international consequences, cultural globalization and its social consequences, the effects of globalization on different regions of the world including Russia, China and the NICs, and the Third World in general.  

  • POL 342 INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND WORLD POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will focus on the explosion of human migration that has occurred around the world over the past few decades and its implications for global politics. Topics covered include refugee movements and politics, border politics and security, deportation, global migration governance, human smuggling, forced/survival migration, migration as a "weapon" of the weak, climate change and migration, security and migration, state migration policies, race and ethnicity, and U.S. immigration policy.   

  • POL 343 MODEL UNITED NATIONS

    LECTURE 3 CREDIT This course offers students the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of international issues and the way they are dealt with by international organizations through participation in a Model United Nations simulation. The course prepares students to represent one or more nations at a college-level Model United Nations and involves researching the selected country as well as a set of issues which they will be discussing and debating at the simulation. Country and UN Committee topics vary each year.  MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT, BUT IT CANNOT COUNT FOR A MAJOR REQUIREMENT MORE THAN ONCE. PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY. 

  • POL 344 U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will survey the factors and forces entering into the creation and implementation of American foreign policy, with an emphasis on contemporary events and issues.  It will also review the mechanics of the U.S. foreign policy making process. 

  • POL 345 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS International politics is full of spectacular events: financial crises, human rights movements, nuclear arms races, revolutions, terrorist attacks, arms control and peace conferences, revolutions, and wars. International Relations (IR) theory helps us explain and understand those events by equipping us with conceptual tools to use to contextualize and examine these events. This course will examine many of these theories with the practical goal of helping us better understand world politics. Theories and IR analytical approaches covered include constructivism, economic structuralism, the English School, feminism, the green approach, liberalism, and realism.  

  • POL 346 GLOBAL POLITICS AND TRANSNATIONAL ISSUES AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS Globalization is the process of integration and increasing interdependence among economies, societies, and cultures on an international level. Transnational issues are the challenges to the survival and well-being of humans and states that arise primarily out of nonmilitary sources, such as global crime, the environment, immigration, and epidemics. The two phenomena are closely related because the former (globalization) is enhancing the salience of the latter (transnational issues) for politics. This class will focus on their implications for international security by examining what International Relations (IR) theories (realism, liberalism, constructivism, structuralism, etc.) have to say about the issues as well as looking at case studies related to them, such as the Arab Spring, human trafficking, small arms trade, oil and resource scarcity, and the U.S.-Mexico border.   

  • POL 347 FOREIGN POLICY: FRAMEWORKS OF AMERICA’S WORLD ROLE, 1776-TODAY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class examines U.S. foreign policy by exploring six common logics or frameworks (e.g., hegemonism, realism, isolationism, etc.) that underscore American strategic thinking. Logics constitute beliefs about foreign policy strategy, national interest, power, and ethical obligations and they will be used to review American foreign policy from the country’s founding through the twenty-first century.  

  • POL 348 INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM AND VIOLENCE

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course offers a basic introduction to terrorism and political violence, such as the history of terrorism, how it functions, the ideology of groups posing the greatest threat to states, and counterterrorism practices. 

  • POL 349 WAR AND PEACE

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course is on war and peace in the international system. What concepts best explain the chances of conflict or cooperation between states or groups? What causes war, and what causes peace? Can war be made obsolete? This class will engage these types of “big” questions that defy easy answers by using two strategies—one, through analyzing conceptually-grounded works by scholars on war and peace, and two, by reviewing case studies of international affairs pertaining to cooperation and conflict amongst global actors.   

  • POL 350 THE POLITICS OF FOOD

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course introduces students to current issues and dilemmas regarding food production, distribution, and consumption, and the implications for peoples around the globe. The course will examine critically the two dominant food production paradigms in today’s work, the industrial, globalized food model and the organic/slow food/grow local model. Linkages will be made to a variety of ethical issues, including ones that deal with the preparation of kosher food. 

  • POL 351 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course examines relationships between states in different areas of the world through the use of theoretical tools from the field of International Relations. Topics vary each year. Recent offerings have included The Politics of Oil and National Security. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT. 

Comparative Politics:

  • POL 352 COMPARATIVE POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS An introduction to the comparative method and theoretical frameworks in comparative politics, focusing on Europe and the Third World. The course examines features common to all political systems, such as party systems and regime types, explores contrasting theories of political change and development, and looks at current issues confronting advanced industrial and less developed nations.       

  • POL 353 ISRAELI POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course will deal with the intricacies of Israeli politics and society through the study of Israel’s political system and its central political forces. The course includes a discussion of Israel’s political institutions, the development of its political parties, its economy, its religious and national communities and the fundamental challenges facing the state as it continues to evolve.  

  • POL 354 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course offers a comparative historical analysis of politics in Latin America, with particular focus on the dynamics of political change, the interaction of economics and politics, and the problems of democracy.       

  • POL 355 MIDDLE EAST POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course surveys the historical background to the present political environment in the Middle East and also focuses on issues such as Islam and radical Islam, the challenge of Modernization and Westernization, culture factors and change and various inter-regional conflicts. 

  • POL 356 THIRD WORLD LITERATURE AND FILM

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course explores issues in Third World politics and development as exemplified through literature and film. The course utilizes material from a variety of less developed regions, including Africa, South and East Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. The course traces the history of the Third World, from the onset of colonialism to the post-colonial era. Topics include colonialism and its legacies, the process of modernization, and the struggle for democratic politics and economic development. 

  • POL 357 TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course examines the politics of different regions of the world on a rotating basis and issues in Comparative Politics. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT. 

Political Theory:

  • POL 360 WHAT IS A NATION-STATE

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS The main political actor in our contemporary world is the nation-state. We tend to take them for granted today, but they have only been in place for a few centuries and there is no reason to suspect they will remain indefinitely. This course evaluates the origins and sustainability of nation-states, especially focusing on their rise and early history of nation-states in the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. It will evaluate theoretical works and historical case studies on the emergence and formation of nations and nationalism.  

  • POL 361 METHODS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to political science research. Unlike much reporting in the news media and arguments made by politicians, interest groups, and lobbyists, students learn how to systematically analyze politics and form a plan to study a political question; how to find evidence most appropriate for answering this question; and how to assess this evidence, using qualitative or quantitative methods, to see how it answers the question. Topics include the logic of inference, creating measures from concepts, some basic statistical methods (requiring only simple high school algebra), and comparison of in-depth qualitative case studies. Students also learn to conduct basic data analysis using statistical software, and to present their findings by creating visually appealing graphics. Upon completing this course, students will have gained a handy set of research tools they can use to analyze political questions and for work in graduate school or corporate and government jobs. 

  • POL 362 THE GREAT MINDS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE VIDEO LECTURES

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This class will watch and discuss conversations, interviews, and lectures of some of the greatest “thinkers” over the past fifty years to examine how prominent scholars engage some of our most difficult political problems and issues. Speakers include Francis Fukuyama, Linus Pauling, Steven Pinker, Theda Skocpol, and Kenneth Waltz, to name but a few of them. Political issues and topics range from poverty, democracy, foreign policy, terrorism, science and politics, the Obama presidency, and world order to women and politics. Readings will also be assigned with the video lectures. 

  • POL 363 FILM AND POLITICS

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course will analyze important political topics and themes by discussing how they are explored in major motion pictures. It will examine the political messages transmitted through the films and the political values that they convey. Examples of themes covered include crime and punishment; capitalism; democracy, socialism, and other forms of governmental forms; the individual and the state; and war. 

  • POL 364 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEORY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course examines a number of questions, including human nature and its impact on how we structure political institutions, the relationship of the individual to society, and the role of ideologies and values in politics. Classical philosophical texts will be used. 

  • POL 365 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Political ideas may embody abstract principles, but they are also tied to the political world: they reflect social concerns and shape governing institutions and political practices. In particular, we will examine the influence of different strains of political thought in America and its contribution to conceptions of American democracy. By utilizing the original writings and closely examining these documents, students should be able to trace current political debates and ideas to the origin of these thoughts. The political principles of the American Founding Fathers, influenced by Lockean social compact theory and British constitutionalism, shaped and guided American political institutions until well into the nineteenth century. Those principles were challenged and rejected by American Progressivism, which derived its fundamental tenets from post-Lockean European sources. 

  • POL 366 TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY

    LECTURE 3 CREDITS This course will focus on a particular subset of political theory or the ideas of particular political thinkers. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT. 

Other Upper Division Courses: